Words cannot describe.

Santa Rosa de Copan
Venta de Dominios

Honduran representation in USA

Washington — Honduran Embassy
Address 3007 Tilden Street, NW    Suite 4-M
Washington, DC 20008
Phone local: 202-966-7702

Atlanta — Honduran Consulate-General
Address 2750 Buford Hwy NE, Suite 218
Atlanta, GA 30324
Phone local: (770) 645.8881

Chicago — Honduran Consulate-General
Address 4506 W. Fullerton Ave
Chicago IL 60639
Phone local: (773) 342.8281

Los Angeles — Honduran Consulate-General
Address 3550 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 320
Los Angeles, CA 90010
Phone local: (213) 995.6406

Miami — Honduran Consulate-General
Address 8600 Nw 36th St, Suite 510
Miami, FL 33166
Phone local: (305) 269.3131

New Orleans — Honduran Consulate-General
Address 2 Canal St, Suite 1641
World Trade Center
New Orleans, LA 70130
Phone local: (504) 522.3118


New York — Honduran Consulate-General
Address 255 West 36 Street, First Level
New York, NY 10018
Phone local: (212) 714.9451

Phoenix — Honduran Consulate-General
Address 4040 E. McDowell Rd, #305
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Phone local: (602) 273.0173


Houston — Honduran Consulate
Address 7400 Harwin Drive Suite 200
Houston, TX 77036
Phone local: (713) 785.5625

Washington — Honduran Consulate
Address 1014 M Street NW
Washington DC 20001
Phone local: (202) 506.4995

New York — Honduran Permanent Mission to the UN
Address 866 United Nations Plaza, Suite 417
New York NY 10017
Phone local: (212) 752.3370

Copan Ruins
Dinero rapido

Honduras is one of the poorest countries in Latin America and has the world's highest murder rate. More than half of the population lives in poverty and per capita income is one of the lowest in the region.


Poverty rates are higher among rural and indigenous people and in the south, west, and along the eastern border than in the north and central areas where most of Honduras' industries and infrastructure are concentrated.


The increased productivity needed to break Honduras' persistent high poverty rate depends, in part, on further improvements in educational attainment.


Although primary-school enrollment is near 100%, educational quality is poor, the drop-out rate and grade repetition remain high, and teacher and school accountability is low.


Honduras' population growth rate has slowed since the 1990s, but it remains high at nearly 2% annually because the birth rate averages approximately three children per woman and more among rural, indigenous, and poor women.


Consequently, Honduras' young adult population - ages 15 to 29 - is projected to continue growing rapidly for the next three decades and then stabilize or slowly shrink.


​Population growth and limited job prospects outside of agriculture will continue to drive emigration. Remittances represent about a fifth of GDP.